Category Archives: buying

Five Biggest Mistakes When Buying a Car

Used Car Buying Mistakes

Buying a car is not like buying a toaster at Walmart. It’s much more complicated with lots of opportunities to make mistakes, not to mention that a large amount of money at stake.

Five Mistakes Made Buying a Used Car

1. Not Doing Enough Research

To many people, buying a car is nothing more than an emotional decision based on color, styling, image, or initial impressions — much like buying a pair of shoes.

However, this can be a mistake when buying a car. Doing proper pre-purchase research is essential. Use Consumer Reports magazine/website to review reliability, safety, and performance ratings.  Get a vehicle history report from Carfax on the car you are interested in. Visit online car forums to get owner opinions and experiences.  Talk to service shop personnel for opinions.

2. Not Test-Driving the Car

A good long test drive is essential to discovering critical problems and issues with a car — and avoiding a big mistake. This should be more than simply driving around the block. It should involve low speed and stop-and-go on city streets, and higher speed on highways.

This is also the chance to check to see that all equipment works — A/C, heater, sound system, lights, and to check for tire wear, body damage, and low fluid levels. Look underneath for signs of leaks.

3. Not Having the Car Inspected by a Mechanic

Never take the word of a used car seller or dealer that his car “runs great” or “has no problems.”  He could be less than honest, or he might simply not be aware of hidden problems.

A professional mechanic’s detailed inspection and problem report can cost $75-$150 but is the only way you can know the real condition of a car you are considering to buy. It could prevent you from making a huge mistake.

4. Paying Too Much

Used car sellers and dealers always set an “asking” price that is higher than the price they are willing to sell for. If you don’t negotiate a lower price, you will probably pay more than the car is worth.  Generally, a 10% discount is reasonable.

However, even with a discount, you could still be making a mistake by paying too much. Use vehicle value guides such as those from Kelley Blue Book and NADA Guides to get a ball-park estimate of the value of the car you want to buy.

5. Ignoring the Car’s Title

Many buyers make the mistake of not examining a seller’s car title before buying.  If it’s an individual seller, the name on the title should be the same as the seller’s name. The VIN on the title should match the VIN of the car. There should be no indication of a lien or salvage/rebuilt status.

If buying from a used car dealer, he might not have the title if he recently bought the car at auction. He’ll send you the title later, and the name on it will be the previous owner, not the dealer’s name — which is not a problem.

Summary

Don’t make common mistakes when buying a car. Investing a little time and effort in the process will reward you with a successful purchase.

Buying a Used Car – Pros and Cons

Most people know that buying a used car is smarter than buying a brand new car.

But is that always true?

A used car can certainly save money, but at higher risk.

Most cars depreciate rapidly in the first 3-5 years, losing 50% or more of their original value, even those in near perfect condition.  Furthermore, car manufacturers only make major style changes every 4-5 years.

This means you can pick up a relatively new used car for about half the cost of a brand new model and still get essentially the same styling.

It’s also possible to find used cars that are 10 years old or older that are in excellent condition, and make excellent buys.

Sounds great but what’s the catch?

A used car is — well — used, previously owned and driven.  Those other owners may have driven the car sensibly, or not. They may have taken good care of it and maintained it as recommended by the manufacturer, or not. They may have damaged it and had it repaired by professionals, or not.  They may have driven excessive miles, or not.

A car is a mechanical machine and all mechanical machines suffer wear and tear with use.  They can have problems, some serious, some not.

Some makes and models tend to have more problems than others. Consumer Reports magazine, in the annual Auto Issue, publishes the results of a survey of thousands of car owners. It rates and ranks each model according to number and type of reported problems.

Furthermore, every used car is different. No two are alike. One can be a jewel that has low mileage, has been driven and maintained properly, and never wrecked. Another of the same make, model, and year can be junk with hidden problems, excessive wear, and poorly repaired damages.

What does this mean to a used car buyer?

Of all the possible issues that might prevent one from buying a used car, only a few are obvious to an average buyer.

It’s not obvious how a car has been driven or maintained by a previous owner — or owners. It’s not obvious that it might have been wrecked. It’s not obvious that it might have had reliability problems in the past, and will continue to do so. It’s not obvious why the previous owner is getting rid of his car. It’s not obvious that there might still be an outstanding lien.

The two major things that most buyers first focus on are 1) appearance condition, and 2) mileage.

First, appearance can be deceiving. There can be hidden problems not apparent to the eye.  Second, mileage is not a good indicator of a car’s condition.  A car with high mileage can be a good car, just as one with low miles can be terrible.

Many buyers look at Carfax or AutoCheck vehicle history reports as a way of researching a used car purchase. However, these reports are often inaccurate and incomplete, and don’t say anything about a car’s all important current condition.

What to do?

Although it’s possible to make some determination of a used car’s condition by asking the owner or dealer questions, test driving, and doing a cursory inspection; this is generally not sufficient.

The best way to know the actual mechanical condition and future reliability of a used car is to have it inspected by your own professional mechanic before you buy.

He can give you a detailed problem report that you can use to make a decision about buying. It can cost $75-$150 but is worth it if it prevents you from making a big mistake.

Let’s sum it up.

Buying a used car is much different from buying a brand new car that has never been driven, has no problems (usually), has never been wrecked, and has full warranty protection from the manufacturer.

There is more risk when buying used, which means a buyer must take more care and expend more time and effort in making a good decision. If done correctly, it can result in getting a great car for a great price.

What to Ask When Buying a Car

Car buying questionsWe’ve heard the question asked hundreds of times: “I’m buying a car. What questions should I ask?”

The answer is different depending on where you intend to buy your car — used car from an individual seller, used car from a dealer, or new car from a dealer.

Let’s look at each situation.

Questions when buying a used car from an individual

Important questions to ask when buying a car from a private seller:

  1. What is the car’s make, model, year, and mileage?
  2. Are you the original owner?
  3. Has the car ever been wrecked or seriously damaged?
  4. What problems does the car have now?
  5. Have you made recent repairs? For what?
  6. How does it drive?
  7. Are you the owner of the vehicle?
  8. Do you have the title?
  9. Is yours the name on the title?
  10. May I see the title?
  11. May I test drive the car?
  12. May I have my own mechanic check it out?

Continue reading What to Ask When Buying a Car

Car Seller Scam Explained

Car Seller Advertises a Car Online – You Buy – Your Money Disappears and You Get No Car

[ If you are selling a used car and suspect a scam by a potential buyer, see our article, Car Buyer Scam ]

How the car selling scam works

car seller scamIt’s a common scam. Here’s how it works.

You find a car being advertised online on Craigslist, Autotrader, or other online classified ad web site. You like the car. You want it. The picture of the car is beautiful, the description is wonderful, and the price is unbelievably low.

You contact the “seller” who emails you details about the car and why it’s being sold so cheap.

By the way, the “seller” often has a woman’s name, which is intended to make him seem more trustworthy.

The seller (scammer) goes to great length to tell the story of his/her personal situation, a spouse’s death, a military deployment,  or other reason why he/she is selling. they explain how they are in a remote location (often military) with no phone, why the car is being sold at such a low price, how it will be “shipped” to you at no cost, and how your money will be “protected” by eBay, PayPal, or Amazon while you inspect the car, and that you can return it at no cost if you don’t like it.

Continue reading Car Seller Scam Explained

Car Auctions for Good Cheap Cars

Public Car Auctions, Government Auctions, Police Auctions, Repo Auctions, and Salvage Auctions

used car auctionsCar buyers who are looking for cheap cars often overlook public car auctions, or dismiss them because they think the auctions are only for car dealers.

It’s true that there are dealer-only auctions, but there are also many car auctions open to the public that provide an opportunity to pick up good used cars for good prices — if you know where to look and know how the auction process works.

What kinds of car auctions are open to the public?

  • Public wholesale car auctions
  • Government surplus auctions
  • Police and law enforcement seized car auctions
  • Unclaimed and abandoned vehicle auctions
  • Repossessed vehicle auctions
  • Salvage vehicle auctions
  • Public wholesale auctions

Continue reading Car Auctions for Good Cheap Cars

Should I Buy This Car?

Question: Should I buy this car?

high mileage used carThis is a common question and is often asked when inexperienced buyers are considering a used car they have found for sale either from a dealer or individual seller.

We see this question frequently on automotive question-and-answer web sites on which we participate.

However, when the question is presented, it typically doesn’t contain enough information to allow a knowledgeable answer, which indicates that the asker doesn’t have sufficient experience to evaluate a car purchase for themselves.

The person asking the question might simply provide the make, model, and year of the vehicle. — and maybe the mileage.

They leave out important factors such as asking price, market value of the vehicle (from kbb.com and nadaguides.com), Carfax report information (accident and repair reports, number of owners, mileage stages),  title status (clean, lien, salvage, rebuilt), or condition.

Continue reading Should I Buy This Car?

Best Car for Teenagers? Explained

What car is ideal for teen drivers?

cars for teen driversAsk a teenager what car they want and then ask their parents what car they prefer for their child. You can get some pretty different answers. However, you just might get some surprising agreements too.

We hear teens asking the same questions over and over again. “Which is the best car for me?”, “What car should I get?”, “What is the best car for a first-time buyer?”, and “Which car has the best reliability-safety-style-performance-gas mileage-cost?”

We will try to help answer those questions here in this article.

Continue reading Best Car for Teenagers? Explained

Where to Find Cheap Used Cars?

Cheap Cars – Where to Find and How to Buy

cheap carsTo some people, a good cheap car is one that costs less than $10,000.

To others, an inexpensive used car may be one that costs $2000 or less.

We’ll tell you how and where to find the car you need, at the price you want, regardless of your price objective or budget.

Cheap car tips

Usually, but not always, buying a cheap car means finding an older used car– a second hand car – possibly with high mileage. Unfortunately, the older a car, the greater the possibility for serious problems and expenses that were not anticipated. Exceptions can be found of course and, with a little effort, good “oldies” can be found at bargain prices.

Most used cars are sold “as is” and come with no warranties or guarantees. Therefore, it is important to thoroughly inspect any car you intend to buy, and not take the word of the seller about the car’s condition. Also get a Carfax® or AutoCheck® vehicle history report. If problems are found after the sale, you will not be able to return the car and get your money back, even if the seller deceived you.

Continue reading Where to Find Cheap Used Cars?

Used Car Prices – Pricing and Negotiating

How to Find Used Car Prices and Negotiate Best Deals

how to negotiate car dealsBuyers and sellers of used cars often wonder how prices and values are determined. How are values of used cars set? Who sets values? Are the values reliable?

If you are a buyer, is the seller’s asking price being fair? Are you paying too much? Can you talk the seller down on his price? What price should you offer without being unreasonable? What if the seller doesn’t accept your price?

If you are a seller, how much should you ask for your car? How do you determine used car values? What is a fair price to ask? Should you set a higher asking price to allow room for negotiation?

These are all common questions. Let’s try to answer them here.

Used car prices are not an exact science

We all know that a brand new car’s value begins to depreciate as soon as it’s driven off the dealer’s lot, often as much as 20% of MSRP (Manufacturers Suggested Retail Price – sticker price).

Continue reading Used Car Prices – Pricing and Negotiating

Best Used Car Web Sites – Recommendations

Best Places to Find Used Cars Online

used cars onlineOne of the best — and easiest — places to find cars for sale is online — on web sites that specialize in listing pre-owned vehicles.

Online used car web sites fall into three categories: 1) Non-dealer sites that sell cars listed by private sellers, 2) sites that only sell dealer cars, or 3) those that sell cars listed by both.

Actually, many of the so-called non-dealer sites actually have dealer cars, thinly disguised as private-seller cars.

Web sites with Cars from Private-Party Individual Sellers

There are hundreds, if not thousands, of classified-ad web sites that advertise used cars for sale by individuals. Here are reviews of some of the most popular sites:

Continue reading Best Used Car Web Sites – Recommendations